Some background.
 

 

Hi! My name is Roxanne, but I go by Roxie.

The first time I ever tried this thing called "yoga," was as a college freshman taking an elective class. I had dance experience, and I remember the description was something vague about ‘stretching.’ I walked into a class that was something I had never seen or heard of, and on day one I was mesmerized.

Before that I was an active kid. I swam, rode horses, danced Ballet, and even had a bout with Kung Fu. So when I took yoga for the first time, I was initially attracted to the athletic side of it.  Fluid movement, bending and stretching, and just the simple sense of accomplishment in posture. I was hooked and I have never looked back.

The more I learn about yoga and asana, the more I am drawn to it. Certainly for so many other reasons other than the physical elements. But I do especially enjoy the physical practice of asana, and I’m constantly trying to expand my knowledge about the body and anatomy.

I'm a decade into this practice, and I have barely scratched the surface.

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I was strongly influenced by my first teachers in New Mexico. I remember the three teachers I had in college, I remember their teachings, and how unique they each were. How I wish I could track them down, write them a letter and thank them!

When I moved to New England, I sought more formal training, just to learn more about yoga and not intending on becoming a teacher. I received a 200hr vinyasa yoga instructor certification, under the instructor Ame Wren. Even though I was adamant about not teaching, it was she who suggested I at least try for a little while. Well, it was a slippery slope from there.

Then I completed a 300hr yoga training program, continuing my study of vinyasa under Natasha Rizopoulos. I had a serious ashtanga practice for a while. I spent a lot of time assisting other instructors.

But then I started drifting into the realm of Slow Flow practiced under Barbara Benagh. I felt like I found someone who spoke my language. When Barbara Benagh decided to retire and leave New England, I wasn't sure what to do with myself, so I completed another 300hr training lead by both Ame Wren and Kevin Courtney. 

I value all these teachers. They’ve all guided and influenced me as a practitioner and as an instructor. I’m often tell people that it doesn’t matter which teacher training you complete, I am the sum of my parts. I am continuously inspired by mentors like Ame Wren, Barbara Benagh, and Tias Little.

And my quest to learn more continues. But really, I am just overwhelmed and thrilled with my opportunity to teach. Everyday I am surprised at how much more there is to learn about it, and I relish that. I genuinely look forward to sharing the experience of yoga and asana with others.